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managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war in the year after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was 1943, a correspondent named eugene burns wrote a very good contemporary book called "then there was one." and that title refer today the fact that at the height of the guadalcanal campaign, which was the most closely-fought air/sea/land campaign in the war, only enterprise remained afloat of our six carriers that had combat in the pacific in 1942. the only other survivor was uss saratoga which sustained heavy battle damage on two occasions and, therefore, missed almost the entirety of that year. so considering that ed stafford wrote a 200,000-word or book about the enterprise, what is it that here 50 years later warrants another one? and i think there's a couple of reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that rotated enterprise during the entire war. but he's told me in a couple of e-mails that he wished he had been able to write a longer book -- and it took him five years
to take action against terrorist the plots. whether it confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts
that takes place in the united states where i now live and work. canadian police arrested muslims for plotting to blow up the parliament and the head of the prime minister. they called the campaign of operation bodr. it's a tribute to the first decisive military victory of the prophet mohammed. the police knew that religious symbolism helped inspire the toronto's 17. still at the press briefing to announce those, the police did not mention the words muslim or islam. the second meeting of the press they boasted and brag about avoiding the world's muslims and islam. they had organized in the name of islam. three months later of a police conference i raised my concern about the silence. after my plea for honesty several law enforcement insiders independent of each other confided to me that the lawyers prevented these authorities from publicly uttering the words muslims and islam. as for my experience in the united states, here is a concrete one. in 2009i received media calls about david headley, and u.s. citizen that planned the terrorist attacks on bombay in 2008 in other words a ye
was essential to the way the united states was able to pursue the pacific war after pearl harbor. shortly after the end of the guadalcanal campaign which was early 43 and the correspondent wrote a very good contemporary book that title referred to the fact at the heart of the canal can pay and which was the closely fought campaign in the pacific war enterprise was in our carriers combat in the pacific in 1922 the only other survivor was the uss saratoga which sustained on two occasions and therefore miss to the entirety for that year of years later couple reasons. number one, stafford's book is superb on the aviation aspects of the various unions, the squadrons that go through the enterprise during the entire war but he's told in a couple of e-mails he wished that they had been able to write a longer book and a road to the cut took him five years to write this one that would include more of the ship's company with with the navy called white hats, the steelers between them and the commission officers and the sheep petty officers who need the ship work and consequently, i wanted to devote a good
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
are being smaller and one way you do that as is this idea of having crews fly from the united states to overseas operating theaters to replace each other to a policy sometimes called cruise swaps or think swaps. it's hard to do and in fairness to the navy it's already been done on some ships and in fairness to the navy so i think that's the kind of idea that needs to be expanded and generalize because we need more innovative ways of using late lamented -- limited sources of what we are to have. >> going forward regardless of who is president the administration may change but the math remains the same. there are some hard fiscal issues they will have to deal with an and defense is going to have hard strategic choices and i look forward to getting past the election when we can see whatever administration is in charge and what they start to do in terms of making the strategic choices but the longer you wait the tougher the decisions get. this idea that both sides are pursuing, setting a particular budget target and saying that is what we are going to stick to and fill in the strategy be
do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
major office. i give up the opportunity in my plan is for president of the united states for 2016 and my plan is to be the first third-party candidate to win the presidency. >> guest: >> host: this is booktv on c-span two. where freedom fest held annually in las vegas, talking to several authors. we've been talking with wayne allyn root. "the conscience of a libertarian" as the name of the book. >> and booktv is on location in las vegas at the annual freedom fest conference and we are interviewing several authors here and were pleased to be joined now by the vice presidential nominee for the libertarian party for vice president for vice president of the united states, judge james gray, who is also an author and his book is called "why our drug laws have failed and what we can do about it." judge gray, if we could does start with your background. tell us your background. >> guest: sure, i was at ucla, go bruins, not sort of thing. and i was in the peace corps two years in costa rica. and on the vice presidential nominee for the party. i'm the first peace corps volunteer to be elected to n
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
and in the united states, particularly at duke university where they had a big hyperbaric facility and they were back in chambers. there were still some government funding and they're still trying to figure out how long could a diver stay down, how deep could a diver go. and it turned out, and i described, i sort of follow that question in the book because as i said it seemed like isn't this something we know, how high amount everest is and what the deepest sound is? it seems like it's a given, it's not. but what you find is because gas has become more dense and significant doubts under greater pressure, it does feel in the divers describe the sensation like they're breeding a liquid almost. that is so thick that they have to mouse brief very deliberately to get the gases in and out and so that makes me uncomfortable because when you are eating your not really breathing. and so that was kind of the issues that came up against, when they get to depths, let's say beyond 1500 feet, over some experiments over 2000 feet of depth. and in a commercial oilfield now, i think 1000-foot dives are still, th
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
a second obama term and how the united states -- thanks. >> brief word on that. iran policy is going to be close to the center of this but let me make a more specific answer with the matter todd raised. missile defense. the obama administration would be interested in finding a way to smooth relations with russia over subsequent stages to european missile defense architecture. i don't know if president obama could just give vladimir putin a veto. i also don't think he is going to feel a hypothetical plan for 2018 developed a couple years ago needs to be seen and set in stone where governor romney because of his strong views towards russia would see it as a way to establish in backing off on the campaign trail even if language about russia and the top geostrategic threat was overstated and not something he chose for the convention speech but made it pretty clear in that speech that he does see the need to stand up to russia and european missile defense is an important case in point. the other thing i will mention is on strategic nuclear arms control. of the three people i have been men
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
, which says, the judicial power of the united states shall be vested in one supreme court and such inferior courts the congress may from time to time ordain and establish. and that is as article iii goes on and talks a bit about the jurisdiction of the court and so on, but many, many unanswered questions, including for instance no mention of the chief justice in article iii. we only inferred that are supposed to be a chief justice because he is given in article article ii, the presidential article, the right to preside over -- not the right, the duty to preside over the impeachment trial in the senate of the president of the united states. and remember, william rehnquist did that in the bill clinton impeachment trial and when he was later asked what it had amounted to, he said i did nothing in particular and i did it very well. so the duties of the chief justice are undefined. and much about the supreme court initially with undefined. so it really had to create itself and it's done so not in a straight line progression, but it's done so true askew says some of the cases th
to the united states, and nobody in this body has worked harder on bringing jobs home to the united states than the presiding officer, the senator from ohio, senator brown. well, the ryan plan would do exactly the opposite. it would tell big corporations that if they move their business operations overseas, they'll never pay taxes on those again. the ryan plan is really a jobs bill for china, for india, for korea. not for america. it's an offshoring rewards act. in addition to those upside down tax changes that harm the middle class and raise their taxes to cut taxes for the highest earners in this country, in addition to its inducements to offshore more jobs instead of bringing them home, the ryan budget would slash $2.9 trillion from our health care programs beginning for workers who retire in 2023, mr. ryan would convert medicare to a voucher system, which according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office would ultimately add an estimated $6,000 in annual out-of-pocket costs that our retirees, our seniors, would have to fork over. it's hard to imagine how future seniors living on a fi
>> there is no the community in the united states of america the votes overwhelmingly 90% for one party. in 1996 i realized we voted republican. we only -- were the only race in the united states of america that is done. it's created a system that decided the republican party where republicans say we've got to win without them. so somebody starts with whether they are racist or not racist, people say stupid things in both parties. i used to get into that debate. i don't anymore. i'm just about trying to build people up, not tear people down. so that was a stupid discussion. do i think that is reflective of the whole party? now i don't. i don't publicly that. my point, i'm not trying to defend him. i don't come to these discussions trying to defend republicans nor do i come trying to defend democrats. i comes and here's what i believe and here's what i support. getting back to the point, if were able to look at some kind of model where we to 20% of the african-american committee and we said okay, you be a democrat, get engaged, go work on the hill, be a big fundraiser, to the polic
on poverty in the united states. and when you look at this you can't -- it seems as though as a purchase is a population the country has made some gains of a year's. 22 percent of the population and poverty in 1959 before anti-poverty programs. 15% today. can you add some historical context? >> we are almost back where we were in the 60's when you look at the poverty rate. 15 percent. i'm looking farther back at 59. 22%. >> i see. when you look overall you do see that the rita think the thing to keep in mind of this report to fly here from a lot of people. there's still a lot of people in poverty even though historically gone down from 22 to 15%. 26 million people is still a significant number of people. the other thing is the idea of how we define poverty. this is the official poverty rate for this country. if you're a family of four that's about $23,000 to be considered in poverty. there's a lot of critics out there that say if your family of four and you have $24,000 they're hurting just as much even though you're not counted as being in poverty. especially if you're in a major metrop
american forces, became two-term president of the united states and the for some reason the los angeles press corps was paralyzed in place. so i stepped forward and i began asking questions of what i called, general eisenhower. i didn't call him the president because, to me had always been a general. we had really good exchange. and in which he said he wanted reagan to run as a favorite son in six at this it. -- '68. you thought that with be good for the party around good for the country. that was in his own way a shot at rich richard nixon. >> guest: boom, you write, one minute ike and man in gray flannel suit in the lonely crowd and next minute, tune on, tune in, drop out, time for we shall overcome and burn baby burn. while americans were walking on the moon, americans were dying in vietnam. there were assassinations and riots. jackie kennedy became jackie o. ty e-die shirts rpt martin luther king, jr. george wallace, tom hayden and. mick jagger and wayne newton. well you get the idea, boom. >> guest: i don't want to overstate this seldom in our recent history at least has there been
the very stylish, 34-year-old first lady of the united states surrounded by all these dashing people and then that came to an end. and the war began to heat up and suddenly the country seemed, seemed to come unhinged in a way. all the values of the world war ii generation come home with challenged within their own families. institutions of government, place of government in our lives. the idea of loyaltity and patriotism all went out the window. civil rights movement went from nonviolent movement led by dr. king depending on rule of law, it went to the streets. you know, violence in america is as as american as cherry pie. so it was a, it was a head-snapping time. there was no question about it and the fact that we emerged from it and reasonably good shape is still fairly astonishing to me. it is a real tribute to the tense aisle strength of this country in a lot of ways. >> host: i began my marriage, tom brokaw writes and my career as journalist in 1962, a straight arrow product of the 1960s. by the time decade was over i had my first taste of the marijuana, i had long hair and week
the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 19, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 499, s. 3521, which is the tax extenders legislation reported out of the finance committee previously. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 4, s. 3521, a bill amend the internal revenue code of 1986 to extend certain expiring provisions. mr. reid: madam president, following my remarks and those of my distinguishe
citizens of the united states. he credited churchill with influencing his ideas on foreign policy and the way he talked with the russian counter parts in years to come. then, a few years later, he see the influence of church hill's words and example on ronald reagan and margaret thatcher and the way they mute the special relationship forward. even gorbachev acknowledged the role of the speech in finding a way forward without resulting to directive war. what can it teach us here in the room? the soviet union is in war? in this age we have turned cynical toward the politician. we too often dismiss a speaker on either side as pulling something over on one of us. somebody who has a lot of say but not a lot to do. but i think the right speech, delivered by the right speaker, at the right time has the power with bringing the nation in to a being. as with the decoration of independents. he has the power to -- he warned hit hitler we shall never surrender. it has the power to aspire our enemies to change. ronald region speaking in berlin to tear down the wall to gorbachev, the berlin wall
the. he served forty-third solicitor general of the united states from june of 2005 until june of 2008. prior to the conversation of solicitor general he served as acting solicitor general for nearly a year, as deputy solicitor general for three years and seven years of service is the longest period of continuous service, in the nineteenth century. he argued 16 cases before the supreme court including the case with which we began this conference today. mr clement received his bachelor's degree from shore -- storage town university service and master's degree in economics from cambridge university. he graduated from harvard law school as supreme court editor of harvard law review. following graduation, and the u.s. court of appeals. and he went on to serve seat chief counsel of the subcommittee on the constitution and property rights is subject today is intriguing lead in title october term 2011, a constitutional moment. please welcome paul clement. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. great to see the cato institute. is an honor to be here at the podium presenting some th
case ending racial violence, like supremacy in the united states. but they don't come out and say that. fatality and story to convey that. and so michener is conveying roosevelt's interpretation of world war ii. i'm not going to talk much about the movies. you can ask me about the movies because that would take all of next year's program probably to do that, that happy to talk about. it's talk about the memorials. now, some of you have gone to see the world war ii memorial in washington, d.c. you see the arches, the patriarchs and the atlantic and pacific. 400,000 american dead but they are represented by gold stars. so you don't get the griping of you don't get the trauma, you don't get the body parts, you get the gold star. that's the traditional view of the war. it's not that it is a wrong view, but it's not the only view. it wasn't the only view among those who fought the war in the '40s and '50s. when i was a kid in school, we used to have these covers on their school textbooks and they always had rendition of the iwo jima memorial in washington. there you've got these marines fus
publication in the united states. lundy had to leave town as well. he was charged in 1833 -- he wrote an article that was well-known in washington at the time. a black woman was walk across the bridge of the potomac and the constable started chasing her. and people in washington knew what that meant. constables supplemented her income by kidnapping free blacks and selling them into slavery. the woman admitted she was being chased, she fell into the stream and drown. they got ground and buried her. lundy wrote an article and said, look, here's what happened, here is the name of the constable. if the district attorney is going to do something about it, then congress should do something about it. and so he hit the roof. he was this. he immediately charged monday with libel. he was always trying to drive the anti-slavery people out. they wanted to get rid of the anti-slavery forces in washington. and so lundy did the same thing that garrett said. he was facing like a thousand dollar fine, which would be, $20,000 or $100,000 in today's money. he collected one last meal from his friends and
on and have support and the energy of the people and the interest of the people of the united states. we have seen the program grow, and we have seen it grow into a healthy child. of this, to me, is a personal highlight that i will never forget. those are the things that i would have. >> the voice of captain george bond, great american character who it's been my privilege to kind of introduce and get people better acquainted with. >> it was greater by the time sealab 2 and sealab 3, but people rally behind i think we might see more than today but that was really the case. after they shut the program down, after sealab 3 at the tragic events around that which are really very much like a polyp 13. we all know apollo 13, the trip to the moon and how just barely kind of made it back. that was like sealab 3 instead of with a less happy any. and one that resulted in the investigation, at the end of the program, but the programs and did not and the fact that they learned a lot after this, about deep diving and deficit at the et
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